Bicycle Accidents in Los Angeles: The Facts


Bicycle accidents are a serious problem in Los Angeles. Every year, hundreds of people are killed or injured in bicycle accidents. In fact, Los Angeles has the highest rate of bicycle accidents and injuries of any city in California.

There are a number of factors that contribute to the high rate of bicycle accidents in LA. First, the city is very densely populated, which means there are more opportunities for collisions. Second, the city’s climate means that cyclists are often riding in hot, dry conditions, which can lead to dehydration and fatigue.


The scope of the problem in Los Angeles:

According to the California Office of Traffic Safety, there were 783 bicyclists killed in California in 2016. This was a 12.3% increase from the year before. Los Angeles County accounted for the highest number of bicycle fatalities in the state, with 118 deaths. This is a rate of 4.4 deaths per 100,000 people, which is higher than the rate for the state as a whole (3.3 deaths per 100,000 people).


In addition to fatalities, there are also a large number of injuries. In 2016, there were 14,294 bicyclists injured in California. Again, Los Angeles County had the highest number of injuries, with 2,831. This works out to a rate of 102.6 injuries per 100,000 people, which is again higher than the state average (78.6 injuries per 100,000 people).


So what does this all mean? It means that bicycle accidents are a serious problem in Los Angeles. Every year, hundreds of people are killed or injured while riding their bikes. And the problem is only getting worse; both the number of accidents and the number of injuries have been increasing in recent years.


The most common types of bicycle accidents:


There are a few different types of accidents that are particularly common among bicyclists. The first is known as “dooring.” This happens when a motorist opens their door into the path of a cyclist, causing the cyclist to crash into the door and often fall to the ground. This type of accident is particularly dangerous because it can cause serious head and neck injuries.


The second type of common accident is known as a “right hook.” This happens when a driver turns right into the path of an oncoming cyclist. The cyclist may swerve to avoid being hit, but often they are struck by the car and thrown to the ground. This type of accident often occurs at intersections where motorists fail to see approaching cyclists.


The third type of common accident is known as a “left cross.” This happens when a driver turns left into the path of an oncoming cyclist. Like with right hooks, cyclists may swerve to avoid being hit, but they often end up being struck by the car and thrown to the ground. Left crosses usually occur at intersections where drivers fail to yield to oncoming traffic.

All three of these types of accidents are fairly common in Los Angeles. In fact, they account for a large majority of all bicycle accidents that occur in the city.


The most common injuries associated with bicycle accidents:


There are a few different types of injuries that are commonly associated with bicycle accidents. The first is known as “road rash.” This is when skin comes into contact with the ground or another surface and rubs off. Road rash can be extremely painful and often requires medical attention.


The second type of injury is known as a “concussion.” A concussion is a type of brain injury that can occur when the head strikes an object or is struck by an object. Concussions can cause headaches, dizziness, nausea, and even loss of consciousness. They can also lead to long-term problems such as memory problems and difficulty concentrating.


The third type of injury is known as a “fracture.” A fracture is when a bone breaks or cracks. Fractures can be extremely painful and often require surgery to heal properly. They can also lead to long-term problems such as chronic pain and limited mobility. All three of these types of injuries are fairly common among cyclists who are involved in accidents

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